Tag Archives: University of Michigan

Gymnastics, Jazz, Infinite Winter

What do these have in common?  Nothing except enumerating my weekend’s activities.Gymnastics, Jazz, Infinite Winter

Friday, we went with some friends to the Men’s NCAA Gymnastic Team Finals.  Not because we’re huge gymnastics buffs or anything but because we figured it would be something fun to do, and how often do you get to attend the NCAA finals in any sport?  Michigan was defending their 2013 team championship title, and they didn’t disappoint, winning again this year.

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The whole thing was an interesting event held at the Crisler Center, where they also hold men’s basketball.  They had draped off the upper deck so it wasn’t sold out, but it was still pretty packed, and those fans are LOUD!!!  We were sitting near the Stanford cheering section who were deafening, as well as the almost equally rowdy Cal section, even though Cal wasn’t competing for a team championship; they just had a handful of gymnasts competing individually.  Shockingly, when we got home, our ears were ringing as if we’d just been to a rock concert.  Ugh.

Also, note to self, perhaps bring one of those dust/hygiene masks next time – the chalk dust floating through the air was intense.  It almost looked cloudy from afar, and everything was covered with fine white powder by the time we left.

gym2These dudes had orange shower slippers..Illinois I think.

gym3gym4Penn State on the Horizontal Bar.  They came in last, and by the end, I felt like they were hanging their heads and not really even trying…awkward.  Surprisingly the Big 10 Conference had the most schools represented between University of Michigan, Penn State, Ohio State, Illinois, Iowa, and a few individual participants from Minnesota and Nebraska.  I’m not sure why the Big 10 takes their gymnastics so seriously, but I guess once one school does, they all do, and clearly they are quite good.  I gotta say though, I felt like Michigan made it look pretty easy as compared to some of the other schools.

gym10There was even a Michigan storm trooper cheering. gym9 This guy from Iowa has the biggest back muscles I’ve ever seen in person.  It looks like he has pillows stuffed in there.  Even though it’s more grainy, can we just zoom in on this a second?

gym9  C’mon, that looks fake…

gym8 Getting set mentally.

gym7Parallel bars look really painful.  When they land on the undersides of their upper arms…ouch!

gym6 gym5 Michigan dominated on the pummel horse.

UMich’s Sam Mikulak came in first all around.  Way to go UMich – two in a row!

Saturday, we went with our new friends, fellow Ann Arbor blogger, The Winegetter, and his wife, to downtown Detroit to check out Cliff Bell’s and find some Thai food.cb1 Cliff Bell’s is a dark and cozy jazz bar which opened in 1935.cb2 A nice little jazz trio to warm up the evening, and I love this art deco backsplash lit up in pinks and purples.

The club was one of John Clifford Bell’s many bars/clubs that he opened during and after Prohibition.  It was closed from 1985 until 2005 when it was renovated and reopened.  Some interesting features include little cocktail tables attached and jutting out at intervals from the bar itself and the fact that the building was designed by Albert Kahn.  Albert Kahn was a renowned architect of the late 19th and early-mid 20th centuries, who is credited with designing many many buildings in Detroit and the environs, including University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and according to Wikipedia, is sometimes called “the architect of Detroit.”  Fun fact: his dad was a rabbi.

cb3The dark gilded interior.  The ceiling is domed and painted a deep copper color that almost looks like mahogany and softly reflects the light. cb4The exterior marquee.

After cocktail hour we exited, blinded by the fact that it was still light out, and headed to Bai Mai Thai, located barely two miles from Cliff Bell’s, still technically in downtown Detroit, but really in a seedy Dollar Store strip mall.  No matter that it smelled a bit funny and none of the empty tables had been bused since the last diners, our food was actually really tasty.  We’d been hard pressed to find good thai food in Ann Arbor, since the fast-casual chain No Thai seems to dominate the Yelp ratings, so it was a pleasant surprise to find that this was a pretty good version of drunken noodles and peanut curry (I may have even been convinced to try making curry whereas I have always shunned its coconut creaminess in the past).  We did, however, discover that those two were the better of the four dishes ordered that evening.  Good to note for later.

What with the weather being nice, it was good to get out and do some fun Ann Arbor and Detroit activities this weekend.

Monday, I made my first solo-attempt at cooking Passover Seder for Mark and me.  I made (way too much) roasted sweet potatoes, roasted asparagus and charoset (apples, walnuts, wine, dates) and gathered the ingredients for the Seder Plate (I even roasted the hard boiled egg, which was impressive since I never make eggs of any kind).  I also made a yellow Passover cake from a box with chocolate frosting which tasted a little weird (as many Passover desserts do) but good nonetheless.  The only thing I fudged was the roasted chicken which I bought pre-made at the supermarket.  Somehow it was actually cheaper than buying a raw chicken and roasting it myself, so why wouldn’t I?

passover I even broke out the good china, which I believe was my great grandmother Hannah’s.  Mark and I did the Seder readings ourselves, but we skipped the actual singing of songs since that would entail a solo on my part and chose instead just to read the lyrics.  Overall it was pretty successful if I do say so myself!!  Imagine my horror to wake up on April 15th to this wintry mess:

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Ugh.  Even if I’m assured that this is “the last snow of the year” it’s way too late for that; the “last snow of the year” should’ve been a month ago. 😦  Can we all agree that it’s time for spring now?  Thanks.

Arbor Daze

Bird chirps create a wall of sound behind my eyes.  The drone of the hospital helicopter in the background breaks through momentarily.  I hope it’s a new pilot being trained, because if it’s a true emergency, it’s been in the air for what feels like an awfully long time.  The whirring dies down and the birds are back full force.  It sounds like hundreds of birds – all the same, peeping in the same constant monotone; why haven’t they flown south for the winter?  They start early and wake me up; I testily inch open one eyelid and look up to the skylight: white sky (if I can even see the sky at all, or just the snow piled on the glass).  I easily roll over and push back to sleep, waking up in a few hours, bird free.  If the sky is bright blue (a rare occurrence these days), a wave of sleeping-in guilt washes over me and my mind ticks off the tasks I’ve set for myself for the day.  Do I need to get up and get cracking?  I’ll just shut my eyes for another 30 minutes.

Yeah right.  When they groggily open one, then the other, two hours later, the sky has clouded over and I no longer feel the pull to be productive.

Taking advantage of all that Ann Arbor has to offer has been more difficult than expected.  Not physically or logistically difficult.  More like, the excuses are endless and it’s difficult to overcome the mental barriers I’ve thrown up for myself: It’s too cold to go outside; Mark’s tired when he gets home from work, but I don’t want to go places alone during the day; I am too busy with more mundane pursuits and activities such as reading and drinking coffee.  To be fair (to myself), I did try to leave to go to the gym last week, made it a block and had to turn back for all the skidding in the snow.  The plowing here is not the best, and I don’t see how people still seem to function like there aren’t six inches of snow on the roads at all times.

When I moved to Paris in January of 2006, it was the same story.  For the first few weeks before classes started, I mainly stayed in my apartment (especially after it got dark at 4pm), eating bread and cheese, drinking tea to try to stay warm, and watching France’s version of The Amazing Race on the TV/computer (somehow TV came in over the computer).  It was cut-to-the-bone cold in Paris in January – the damp cold that you can’t shake no matter how many layers you wear.  I didn’t know my neighborhood well.  I didn’t know a lot of people with whom to explore.  So I stayed in and told myself that I would be more adventurous and relaxed when it warmed up, not yet realizing that it wouldn’t “warm up” for another three and half months.

One morning in the second or third week of my stay, standing in line to register for classes at the maze-like, government-style Sorbonne building, I noticed a calendar hanging on the inside of one woman’s cube.  I quickly calculated that as of that moment I had 14 or 15 weeks left in my Paris adventure.  That seemed like forever, overwhelming, I couldn’t get through it, I was homesick.  And what did I have to show for the time that had already been spent?  Not much.  I hadn’t really seen anything or found any hidden gems.

What a rotten story this would make:  Friends: Hey Hannah, what did you do in Paris?  Me:  Welllllll, I ate a lot of cheese!

At that moment I decided to put on my big girl pants and venture out into the cold, even if just to walk the streets and get my bearings.

I started with my favorite: Musee d’Orsay where the Impressionists are in charge and press up against those who came before and after.  Then I started ticking off the smaller museums, because, really the museums are endless (and a good way to stay warm): Musee Picasso, l’Orangerie, Musee Rodin, Le Petit Palais, Victor Hugo’s home.  Along the way, I picked up friends, and friends of friends, who hadn’t yet been to these places, and so we visited together: Marche aux puces (huge flea market on the outskirts of town), Place d’Italie (for pho), La Defense (business center of Paris).  And when visitors from home arrived, we also made the rounds, and luckily most were game to go to places I hadn’t been yet, rather than the obvious Eiffel Tower and Arc de Triomphe (although there had to be some of that too of course).  Each week I read the Periscope magazine (which detailed all the arts and cultural activities for the week for 50 centimes) cover to cover, circling the various temporary exhibits I wanted to see or should see because they were so unique or housed in a unique location.  I saw an exhibit of Rembrandt drawings at the Dutch embassy and one of erotic drawings by Picasso at the Musee de l’erotisme.  We scooted through that one pretty quickly and came out the other side red and shrieking with laughter.  Very mature, 23 Year Old Self.

So back to the point.  Here in Ann Arbor, I’ve done similar research with the monthly Ann Arbor Observer that literally has a day-by-day account of everything going on in town, from music, to sports, to museum exhibits and lectures, even though I never see 90% of what I’ve circled.  But here are few things I have done:

I attended a fascinating lecture in the graduate library about the history of Jewish food and Jewish cookbooks in America, given by one of the preeminent American culinary traditions curators in the country.  I not only learned that the first Jewish settlers in America (in New Amsterdam) were immigrants from Brazil, but we also saw Ashkenazic and Sephardic cookbooks from various the centuries, and even menus from Barney Greengrass and the like.

We went to a free rock-bluegrass concert with some friends at The Ark, an intimate-feeling music venue on Main Street that’s also North America’s oldest continuing not-for-profit music club.  The Ark has a show nearly every night of the year, which is pretty incredible.  We also saw a movie in the historic State Theatre, which was a must-do experience, although as you can imagine, the seats in a historic movie theater are super small and Mark is pretty tall.  state theatre

We’ve tried many restaurants (of which there seem to be an endless supply), including Zingerman’s (famous deli with exhorbitant prices and super excited staff), Mani (sleek Italian restaurant with some of the country’s best pizza according to Eater.com, but you can read my review here), Grizzly Peak and Blue Tractor, two bars that brew their own beers, and Cafe Zola that has an extensive menu on which I have yet to find anything that isn’t amazingly good (including really good crepes).

We’ve gone for walks on the many trails around our home and even kayaked down the Huron River on Labor Day Weekend.  We’ve been to a University of Michigan football game, a Detroits Lions football game, and plan on checking out some college basketball, hockey and even gymnastics (I hear they have a world-class team here).

photo-46(Our resident heron we keep spotting along our Island Park walks.  This was taken during the snowstorm Sunday Jan 5th.  He was standing perfectly upright with just his shoulders hunched up and neck pulled down, like a tall old man waiting at a bus stop with his overcoat pulled high over his stooped shoulders.)

A few weekends ago, Mark and I went to the town of Plymouth, about 35 minutes from Ann Arbor to walk around.  Surprisingly, not many places were open for Saturday lunch, so we just wandered around the small town square that was lined with uniquely-styled Christmas trees.  We drove from the “downtown” to the old village, where I thought maybe there’d be more restaurants.  It was more residential in fact with bungalows and Victorian homes, but we did find Liberty Street Brewing Company, which was a fantastic little bar that brews their own beer and serves a few bar snacks, such as popcorn.  There were a fair number of people in the homey bar for a Saturday afternoon, the bartender was genuinely friendly, and the “Punkin’ Pie” beer was delish (made with zero pumpkin).

Last week, I went with a friend to the University of Michigan Museum of Art for the first time.  I really loved the modern galleries that allowed for natural sunlight to stream in.  They were having a temporary exhibit of color-blocked sculpture by Adolph Gottlieb, one of the founders of the Abstract Expressionist movement, who is best known for his paintings.  They were fun and reminded me a bit of 3D versions of Matisse’s later works.  The museum also has an impressive permanent collection, boasting a snowy Monet oil painting (appropriate for the local climate), multiple Picassos, and rooms of African and Asian art.  It’s small enough to be manageable but large enough that you will want to return to explore the work in more depth.

So, as you can see, in the last few weeks I’ve been trying to push myself to discover all there is to do here.  I’ve driven all over the place, and know my way around fairly well.  But there’s still a lot to explore.  I haven’t yet been to the University’s Museum of Archaeology, the botanical gardens, the Gerald R. Ford Library, or (I’m highly embarrassed to say) the Kerrytown Farmers’ Market (I have been to the Sunday artists market however).  It comes back to the cold and not wanting to do some of these things alone.  But like in Paris, winter lasts a long time here, so I’d better get cracking.

I’ve started a list of places to go and things to do, so I can start checking them off and holding myself accountable.  Maybe chronicling my activities in this blog will help do that.  Otherwise I’m sure to end up snuggled in bed with a book and some tea.  Although that sounds pretty good right about now 🙂

How Volunteering Led Me To Some Good Pizza

In order to start meeting new people in my new town of Ann Arbor and schedule some activities for myself, I decided to volunteer as an advisor at the University of Michigan chapter of the sorority I joined at University of Maryland in undergrad.  I emailed the chapter advisor out of the blue after finding her contact information on the chapter’s website, and we met one evening at Panera for coffee and to discuss opportunities.  She has been leading this chapter for about 14 years, has a great depth chart of other advisors, and was super enthusiastic about getting me involved right away, which was very welcoming of her.

After getting current on my alumnae dues (oops), I attended my first Monday evening chapter meeting the following week, where I met the president and some of the other advisors.  I’m going to be helping the vice president of campus activities, which is a newish position that we didn’t have when I was in school or when I was the chapter advisor at Towson University back in Maryland, so it will be a learning experience in duties and responsibilities, as well as getting to know a whole new (very large) group of collegians.

Right away I was energized to start sharing ideas and asking questions about how this chapter operates differently than the others with which I have been involved.  There are over 200 members, and the new member classes are almost as big as the entire sorority at Towson.  Clearly, things operate differently here.  For instance, whereas initiation ceremony was mandatory for all sisters at Towson, it logistically cannot be mandatory at UMich because the whole sisterhood can’t even fit in the chapter room together at one time!

I learned some interesting tidbits that first evening, both about the sorority and Ann Arbor, not least of which was that I should definitely try Pizza House.  The sisters and the advisors all agreed that Pizza House was delicious, and I was told that professors often place orders here when they are having lunch meetings for large groups.  Interesting.  Especially because their website lists their specialty as Chicago deep dish (not my fav).  Reading the menu further, I saw that they also make thin and super thin crust pizza; they also have an enormous selection of pretty much all other food you could ever want: salads, sandwiches, burgers, Italian favorites, Chipatis (which I’ve heard are just an Ann Arbor thing…a pita pocket filled with salad), wings, desserts, and on and on.

Willing to take a chance, I placed a dinner delivery order of a thin crust pepperoni pizza and a super thin crust chicken pesto pizza.  They said it would take 30 minutes, so I was shocked when 15 minutes later the doorbell rang, catching me completely off guard (also because they came to the garage door and not the front door…I’ve never known a garage door to have a doorbell before).

The pizza was delicious!! Yay!!  “Delicious” is so overused, but it really was.  The thin crust was good thin crust; like your standard pizza: not too bready on the bottom and a regular thickness to the outside crust.  Could have been a little chewier crust, like that good yeasty NYC crust, but okay, that’s just hard to find in general.

The super thin crust was excellent.  I loved the chicken pesto flavors: chunks of chicken, basil pesto sauce, red onion, diced tomato and gooey mozzarella.  Of course, you always love what you know and what you grew up with, and you’re not likely to love something new more than something old that’s held on a pedestal and to which you are comparing the new thing, but I gotta say that this measured up pretty close to my beloved Bagby chicken pesto pizza back home.  The crust was perfectly salty, not overdone or buttery, just like a nicely salted cracker.  Which isn’t to say that the crust was cracker-like, because it wasn’t that hard and crunchy.  It was soft underneath the toppings (maybe I would ask for a little less cheese next time to avoid a bit of sog….I know, I know, less cheese = blasphemy, but sog is unappealing) and crispy at the edges.  I also liked how the toppings came pretty close to the edges.

I apologize for not having a picture.  Worst blogger ever.  I get too excited about eating and then forget to take a picture until it’s all gone! Not to worry though; we will definitely order from Pizza House again, and I will be sure (to try to) remember to take a pic next time around 🙂

Next up: Pizza Bob’s.  I got a recommendation from a friend who went to grad school in AA.  Although she said she’s never had the pizza, she said the milk-free shakes and chipatis were yummy, so I’m hoping that carries over to the pizza too.

As for getting back into sorority volunteerism, I’m enthusiastic about dedicating some time to an organization that promotes women leadership, teamwork and friendship.

It’s a Blog about Nothing! (DOING nothing that is.)

It’s been just about a month since moving to Ann Arbor, and it’s been crazy since the beginning, what with setting up the apartment, traveling home to Baltimore twice, hosting friends for the Notre Dame-UMich football game and going to visit friends in Chicago.  Now I’ve finally got a moment to breathe and all I want to do is veg out.  I’m feeling so exhausted and the thought of getting up and going out to find a job, make new friends and explore this place seems too daunting to do right now. Which isn’t to say I’m not excited to do those things eventually, but today I just want to be mindless.  George on “Seinfeld” created a pilot TV show “about nothing” so I’m doing the same with my blog this week.  Lots of pictures filling up space ahead.

Last week, I took Amtrak to Chicago to visit some high school friends who live there.  Amtrak is so cheap and easy here as opposed to on the East Coast: $70 roundtrip and a 10 minute walk from our apartment to the station in AA.  I got there at the butt-crack of dawn (well actually before that) for the 4 hour 20 minute ride to Chi-town.  ImageAA Amtrak station at night…such a smaller scale than any of the Penn Stations I’m used to…one track, one vending machine.

The train was a bit delayed, but oh well.  (Another story on the way home though…I was supposed to get in at 11:20pm, but instead we had to wait on the tracks about 50 miles outside of town for the West-bound train to pass, so that we could get onto the single track…didn’t get home until 1am…exhausting…but I got a lot of reading done until my Kindle died.)  I hit the tracks back to AA around sunset and captured some pretty colored skies and industrial rigs and buildings:

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Some good Chicago pics, including one of a hunormous piece of lemon meringue pie at Gilt Bar…we ate until we were stuffed!

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ImageView of Lake Michigan from the 96th floor of the Hancock Building….you can almost see the curve of the earth!  How did these spiders get up here on the outside of the windows?  Gross!  Or as my BMS Lower School classmates know to say instead: “Hooooow interesting!”

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The friend with whom I stayed also moved to the Midwest for her husband and has been looking for a job as a lawyer.  It’s too bad we aren’t in the same city during this time of unemployment to get coffee and plan my wedding 🙂  She did, however, remind me of all the great talk shows on during the day!  

To that end, I’ve decided that I’m giving myself this week to completely veg in front of Ellen, Katie, Bethenny, The View and The Chew, while drinking coffee, eating crackers and taking intermittent naps.  I’m going to be a blob that may or may not wash her hair, respond to emails or answer the phone.  My skin may, in fact, start to grow into the fibers of the couch, like bark around an old sign nailed to a tree.

The only things I have to do this week are go to the dry cleaners, get a drink with a friend one evening and write this blog post.  It is difficult for me, however, to allow myself to be completely unproductive.  Today I created a recipe album full of magazine clipings and FoodNetwork.com recipes that I’ve been accumulating for years:

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Tomorrow I’m going to work on my wedding album.

I love lists so much (feeling of organization and accomplishment) that I made myself a TO DO list for my week of leisure:

1. LOUNGE

2. Read books

3. Read magazines

4. Watch TV

5. Nap

6. Make healthy dinners

Who has to write “nap” on a list of things to do?  LOL.  I’m clearly still getting used to this having no responsibility thing, even though it’s been three months since quitting my job and one and a half months since finishing up daily volunteer activities.  Wow, that’s so strange, because it really feels like just yesterday.

We had a great time hosting a bunch of friends for the Notre Dame-Michigan football game at the Big House a week ago.  A) It gave me the kick of motivation to finally put away last little bit of moving stuff that was lying around.  B) It was nice to see so many familiar faces all at once.  C) I got to see ESPN’s College Game Day in person!  This is the pregame show that visits a different college campus each week, however I don’t think they ever came to College Park (University of MD), and this is a show I watch fairly regularly, so it was incredibly exciting to see them broadcast live!  

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ImageUMich clock tower

ImageCollege Game Day bus

ImageCheerleaders

ImageStudents trying to get on TV

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ImageBand’s instrument cases

D) We had tons o fun bar-hopping, t-shirt hunting (since we were turned down for free t-shirts for not being students) and gawking at college shenans leading up to the 8pm kick off.  

ImageMy newly purchased UMich t-shirt….”Gotta support the team!”

Image“Bash The Irish” car with a sledge hammer…$3 per whack or $3 for 5.

ImageCollege pre-game parties

ImageBecause making a vodka-Sprite in your mouth is so much more efficient than wasting a cup!  And no one’s drinking water, so we may as well spray people with it instead!

E) The game itself was slow-moving, but a crazy good atmosphere, and we were part of history as the largest college football crowd ever, anywhere…until maybe later this season 🙂

ImageFlyover…one of many

ImageShiny Notre Dame helmets

ImageFor being the largest stadium in the US, they didn’t actually have lights to be able to play at night until a few years ago!

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ImageGiveaways included these cool “M” light up bracelets (please ignore the sunspots on my hand).  Here they are in action:

ImageWe also got fun yellow pom-poms….I’m going to start a Michigan bulletin board with all the souvenirs of our time here….Like game tickets…and the coupon for a weed-paraphernalia shop that someone was handing out on the street corner.

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Here’s a ‘do that looks like it took some precision.  Definitely “supporting the team” – stop making my t-shirt look bad!

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It’s finally coming into fall a bit here with cooler weather grayer skies.  These trees outside our apartment have the first twinges of fall-colored leaves:

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Until next time…xoxo