Tag Archives: New York artist

Arts Letters & Numbers Residency

This week I am living and working at Arts Letters & Numbers a multidisciplinary artist in residency program in Averill Park, NY, outside of Albany.

sunny eggs apples and flowers

The old mill house where I’m staying with 7 other artists has been repurposed into a retreat for artists from all disciplines, crossing over even into the world of math and science.

After arriving Monday afternoon, we organized our stuff and got straight to the business of having a t party (that would be “t” as in tequila) and “a serious conversation” ~ a salon-style get-together at advisory board members Robert and Diane’s home.

Robert hosting t time

(Robert holding a huge bottle of tequila in the shape of a rifle.)

Read the rest of the story over on my new site. And as I wind down this Next Stop: TBD blog that I’ve so enjoyed writing and sharing with you over the past four (!) years, I’d love to continue the conversation over there.

 

Advertisements
the final peachy version

The Life of a Commissioned Painting

I’m thrilled to work one-on-one with friends and family and clients to paint something in my style that is uniquely for them. I’m always nervous in sending the final photos, hoping and praying that they will love it as much as I do. (Because when you work on something so much, you have to love it in the end…or else you would keep painting, as you’ll see below.) But what happens if they don’t love it? And how does this whole commission business work anyway?

The process is fairly simple and straightforward: you email me saying you’d like to commission a painting. We’ll talk about your budget, your space, the size of the wall, what colors you have in your mind, etc.

I’ll send you a contract with all of the agreed upon details and logistics like delivery date, downpayment and shipping. Even among friends, a contract formalizes everything so there’s no confusion or hurt feelings.

It works best if you already like my work and my style because if I try to recreate someone else’s style that you love, it probably won’t turn out how either of us wants. So there’s a bit of trust that I’m going to run with what we’ve discussed, and you won’t see it until the end.

Below is a commission I did recently; flip through the pictures to see how I changed and re-changed a particular section (upper-middle-right) that I wasn’t happy with: it went from too dark, to too blue, to starting over with white, to WAY too green, to the final peachy version in the end.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

When I’m completely satisfied with the final product, I’ll send you some photos and we’ll set up a time to chat on the phone; but what if you don’t like what I’ve painted?

Well if it’s a matter of a particular area or tiny part of the work, no problem, tell me what’s bothering you, and I’ll tweak it. If it’s that you hate the whole thing altogether, you are under no obligation to buy it, but unfortunately I won’t be able to refund your deposit, since work has been done, materials purchased, etc. Iwill always try to work with you as much as possible to turn the painting into something you love.

I truly love collaborating on commissions and painting with someone in mind and working to make them happy. Obviously I love painting in general, but it’s extra special and purposeful knowing that a home is already being made for the piece.

What to collaborate? Use the contact sheet to email me about commissioning a painting! I have 4 commission spots left for 2016 and look forward to working with you!

Art New York

Art Basel. Art Miami. You’ve heard of these huge international art exhibitions that attract the who’s who of the art world. I would have totally assumed that there was Art New York; why wouldn’t there be? But actually Art New York is only in its second year.

Which doesn’t mean that it’s not a force. I attended the fair at Pier 94 last Wednesday and wandered for hours through the 150 galleries represented. I was thoroughly impressed and delighted.

I wanted to attend the show to specifically see photographic work by Joshua Jensen-Nagle at the Galerie de Bellefeuille. In Jensen-Nagle’s recent works, he takes high aerial photographs of beaches such that the sun bathers, umbrellas and underwater sand patterns become abstractions really. He does have some scenes that are taken at a closer distance which are serene in their lightness and brightness.

IpanemaII Ipanema II, Joshua Jensen-Nagle, photo from http://debellefeuille.com/jensen-nagle-joshua-2/

I chatted for a while with one of the gallerists in the booth about Jensen-Nagle who is from NJ but now lives in Canada (the gallery is in Montreal but represents artists from all over), He told me about the photographic printing method where the photographs are embedded on slabs of acrylic that are backed with metal (aluminum) that really illuminate the photos and make them pop brightly – almost as if they were lit from behind, which they are not (there were some photos at other gallery booths that did have lighting elements). The mounting is called Diasec, which is the trademarked name for the process….I’m sure I’m way oversimplifying this, so if you want to read more, go to Wikipedia.

 

Anyway, I loved meditating on his images for a while, before moving on to see the rest of the show. I was at first a bit put off by the $40 entrance fee, but I guess that’s just proportionate to the cost of the works, which were generally in the $10,000+ range, however you could get a smaller Jensen-Nagle for $2500, and I did see one or two small paintings for under $1000.

A few themes I noted in the works generally were the use of 3D elements and rainbow color schemes.

There was one artist who’s paintings looked like 3D paintings on 2D surfaces, and the images moved as you moved up, down and around the art. It was a crazy optical illusion though! When you got up close, they were in fact painted on wooden 3D panels that stuck out in points from the wall. I feel like I’m not describing this well – think of the shape of a mountain range but sticking out from the wall rather than the ground.

Also, I rounded a corner and saw these photographs and immediately thought: those look like Baltimore. Well, in fact, they were photographs of Baltimore row homes, shown by a gallery from Baltimore.

 

I really enjoyed the art fair immensely and would love to go back next year. I even ran into an old friend I haven’t seen in 10 years! Small world!

Sunrise, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Abstractions: New Art

Like a lot of people, being in nature feels very comforting to me. I loved staring out the window of the car when I was a kid, as my mom can attest, getting lost in the shapes and colors of the clouds. I guess it was my version of meditation.

As an adult, I still love the sights, sounds and smells of nature. Just this morning I thought how happy I was to hear birds in Verdi Square at the 72nd Street subway while walking to work. It reminded me of growing up in the rural suburbs.

And I can still stare at clouds endlessly. The number of sunset and sky pics on my Instagram can corroborate. 🙂

So naturally, I’m drawn to the wide blue skies, sweet green grass and moody grey clouds in my painting. I try to capture the feeling, movement, calmness and tranquility I see and feel when I’m surrounded by the natural world.

In the grouping that I’m putting up today, you’ll notice a lot of playfulness and liberties taken with the idea of “landscape,” “seascape” or “skyscape.” These aren’t super representational works – definitely abstractions to one degree or another. But I hope they evoke in you a sense of peace and happiness when meditating on them. Enjoy, and I welcome feedback on what you’d like to see more of, so please comment or email me!